Next Big Thing is Here – SIP trunks for Voice!

Having been in the Telecom field for well over twenty years, we were always saddled with certain decisions when it came to trunks to PSTN (Public Switch Telephone Network).  If you could live with marginal voice quality or didn’t have the budget to pop for a T-1 voice circuit, you had few options.  Your choices were between using POTS lines, CO (Central Office) trunks, or tie trunks if multi-location. These were typically analog with a snap, crackle, pop reminiscent of Rice Krispies1

The other choice was a voice T-1 or PRI flavor, both of which we were more expensive, but as it was digital, it was crystal clear and the bonus was it only used four wires for 24 phone lines or 23 for PRI (ISDN Primary Rate Interface). Heck, even I paid for PRI though I did not have a need for all the lines as I could not accept sacrificing call quality.

Fast-forward to today and Session Initiation Protocol, aka SIP. There are a lot of cool things about it, but it’s important to understand its current form of implementation.  It can also be implemented in a couple different manners. It can be delivered by your carrier over Ethernet, but don’t think that it will conflict and turn into a VoIP chattering, as it comes in on its own circuit. Alternately, as it is a protocol, it can also be delivered over existing MPLS circuits for multi-location businesses as long as QoS is enabled.  Important to note is that the SIP connection provided by your carrier is from your phone system/PBX to the carrier. The calls to the outside world are still carried through PSTN so the quality will remain acceptable.Print

What is so cool about SIP? First off, it handles both voice and video. But here is the really neat thing, much like a SuperTrunk of days gone by or the PRI of today, if you need less that 20-some lines, but want the robust DID (Direct Inward Dial) functionality, SIP trunks are for you.  Here’s a real scenario. I pay $250 per month for a PRI, but I can get 5 each SIP trunks (at $12 each for 3-year commitment) for $60 a month!  This will save me $190 per month and that’s a good thing – a real good thing!

SIP trunks may not be for everyone and may not even be available in your area, but if considering a new phone system or a new carrier, you should at least consider SIP trunks. If you’re simply changing telecom carrier and want to entertain SIP trunks, you will need to check to see if your phone system is SIP-trunk ready and capable.  Those pesky details!

If you want to know more or if you area or phone system is SIP-trunk ready, feel free to give us a call. We’re here to help!

EdSignature

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Roundbrix is Hosting an AVAYA IP Office Demonstration . . . and feeding you!

To me, there’s nothing like “seeing is believing”. I’ve been in telecom and computers, well, let’s put it this way. When I was a kid, I used to go to Thrifty’s drug store and test my vacuum tubes to see which one had failed so I could get my Zenith shortwave radio working again to listen to Chick Hearn in his early years – and I digress.

 

Flash forward, I have been in IT 30 years and we’re all over what is new. But newer is not always better, as so many of us have learned. The key in entertaining any new voice technology platform is asking a few simple questions:

 

Is what we have now at or near “end of life”, meaning we’re looking at a replacement anyways?

Is it better than what we have now, and if so how? Will it help us be more efficient in a tangible manner?

• What if we don’t do anything, what might be the downsides?

• If I get this, will it scale for my needs for many years downstream?

• Does it have a useful life of more than 5 years, thus lessening my annual total cost of ownership?

 

Then I put on my IT and voice hat and ask a few other questions:

 

• Can I get the best of both worlds – that is less expensive digital phones inside and VoIP for remote sites or remote users and the

functionality is basically the same for both?

• Can I leverage existing CAT3 cabling so I can use the CAT5e for data at 1Gbit (as although some IP phones have 1Gbit switch, they

come at a cost premium)?

• As handsets tend to be about half of the hardware cost, can I leverage any of my existing handsets so I can upgrade the ‘core’ now,

and handsets later to hedge costs?

• Can I use packet-tagging if using VoIP so I don’t have to create VLANs?

• Can it “follow me” so it stays current with my mobile world?

• Does it integrate into my Microsoft environment and have functionality such as Unified Messaging?

• Are the phones full duplex so they don’t cut out while on speakerphone?

• Does it have conference bridge ability and automatically adjust levels so everyone can be heard?

• Can it use remote IP phones in a widely distributed environment of both remote sites and individual users?

 

Lastly, I have an additional consideration for those contemplating or in process of moving. If you are moving, is your money to move your phone system better spent on a new one? Remember, to move the phone system you’ll have to pay cash, but when buying a new system even the labor can be bundled into the lease, so your out-of-pocket during the expense of the move can be reduced, at least on the voice end.

 

So being an authorized AVAYA IP Office Reseller, we figured the best way for you to know if this is something you might want or need, is to tell you about it, show it to you, and feed you to limit your out-of-pocket time!

 

To attend, please RSVP to Shani Griffis at 949 273 5220 or shanigriffis@roundbrix.com . We have limited space so please reply promptly to ensure a spot!